Customer Support Technique #8

Appropriate Nonverbals Nonverbal signals, also known as body language, play an important role in customer satisfaction. Customers tend to be concerned about whether they are a priority to the person they're speaking with based on how much eye contact is made and whether the person standing or sitting appears attentive.


Customer Support Technique #7

Apologize When offering a customer an apology, it’s best to apologize on behalf of your company. When apologizing, don't necessarily think you are admitting fault if you apologize, it does not have to be a long and drawn out speech. Follow the apology up with focusing on solving the problem or addressing customer needs. When you apologize, never say something that sounds insincere or perfunctory.…


Customer Support Technique #6

Allowing Venting Providing customers an opportunity to rant can help them calm down. While venting might make you feel better, it's important to know that there are two different personalities of people. The first type is the “Venter” type -- these individuals will feel better if they let their anger out and talk about why they're upset or angry. But then there's the second personality type:…


Customer Support Technique #5

Admitting Mistakes Responding honestly and taking responsibility are challenging but essential aspects of customer service. When a company, website, or individual makes an error that is behind the problem. It can be difficult to determine who was responsible for the mistake and whether it arose from your own blunder or a company's fault. This helps customers feel reassured in the knowledge that…


Customer Support Technique #4

Active Listening Active listening reinforces your customers' feelings that their opinions are valued and acknowledged. Active listening involves restating the key points of what the customer said, usually in the form of a question, to reinforce this point. For example, “I need to know you're looking for the missing pieces of my product that warrant a refund."


 Customer Support Technique #38

  Probing Questions This technique is the use of a series of questions to help clarify your customer’s needs, feelings, and wants. The probing questions will be simple ones that cover one issue at a time so as not to overwhelm the customer. While most questions are designed to help the interviewer explore a topic in more detail, probing questions elicit further information from customers.…


Customer Support Technique #37

  Privacy and Confidentiality Concerned about keeping their business and conversations private, customers may want to take precautionary measures. When dealing with personal information that you want to keep between the two of you, make sure it’s not overheard and make clear that you are taking steps to protect privacy. Here is a tip. Privacy and confidentiality are top of mind concerns for…


Customer Support Technique #36

  Preemptive Strike "Preemptive Strike" in customer service is anticipating a problem and addressing or acknowle- ding it before the customer brings it up. For example, when a customer has been waiting a long time, you can make an apology or empathize to show that you understand how frustrated the customer is without them having to complain. To avoid conflict, start by recognizing what the…


Customer Support Technique #35

  Plain Language We often forget that customers don’t have the same knowledge of jargon and acronyms as we do. Translating our technical language into useful plain language helps everyone understand what we are trying to say. For example, computer technicians might use the term “LCD” to refer to a liquid crystal display monitor with other engineers, but it may prove unfamiliar for many…


Customer Support Technique #34

  Offering Choices/Empowering Customers get frustrated when they feel that the options are too limited, and it is hard to break through red tape. In order to counter negative feelings for customer service professionals, offer as many choices as possible. This shows respect for their wishes and helps customers exert some positive control over discussions when they would rather not have the…